Offsite Educational Sessions

Saturday

Logged in users will be able to see how many spaces are available in each event.

Riverside State Park & Spokane House

This session will be led by conference keynote speaker Jack Nisbet. Spokane House, the site of the first fur trade post and permanent buildings in Washington State, includes signage for a self-guided walk created in association with Washington State Parks and the Avista Corporation. Stops include landscape features along the Spokane River that look much as David Thompson saw them in 1811; a forage barn from the 1860s; an archaeological excavation from the 1950s; and a mid-century modern museum from the 1970s. At the museum, we will look at an exhibit in progress that is a joint project between the Spokane Tribe and State Parks.

From there we will continue downstream on the Spokane River and through the Spokane Indian Reservation. The road continues on to the confluence of the Spokane and Columbia Rivers and the site of Fort Spokane, a late 19th-century military post that morphed into a tribal school and then a tuberculosis sanitarium. When a new interpretive plan was submitted in the early 2000s, a Spokane tribal culture committee worked with the state to present the tribal side of those stories.

Spokane-based teacher and naturalist Jack Nisbet is the author of several books that explore the human and natural history of the Northwest, including award-winning biographies of mapmaker David Thompson and naturalist David Douglas. Nisbet and his wife Claire have curated museum exhibits and created interpretive signs for agencies and utilities within the Columbia River drainage.

Time: 9:00am–5:00pm
Cost: $95
Maximum Number of Participants: 25
Minimum Number of Participants: 15
Travel: Bus pick-up at the Davenport Grand. Board at 8:30am; return to hotel by 5:00pm
Lunch: Boxed lunch provided
Suggested Gear: Weather-appropriate clothing and comfortable walking shoes.
There was a problem loading this area.

Spokane Preserved (History)

Join us on a bus and walking exploration of Spokane’s core and highlighting the preservation efforts of the city’s history and the innovative ways that a community can use those preserved materials for interpretation. Attendees will explore Spokane’s oldest neighborhood and see its first park. They will enjoy a behind-the-scenes tour of the region’s largest museum and a historic house designed by one of Spokane’s most notable architects. Eat lunch on your own in downtown Spokane. Reconvene in the Historic Davenport Hotel for a walking tour interpreting Spokane’s industrial past through advertising remnants known as Ghost Signs. The tour will wrap with a warm cup of coffee and a final thought. Part of this tour will be a walking tour back to the Davenport Grand. Please be sure to wear appropriate clothing.

Led by: Logan Camporeale
Time: 8:30am–4:30pm
Cost: $45
Maximum Number of Participants: 25
Minimum Number of Participants: 15
Travel: Bus pick-up at the Davenport Grand at 8:30am; return to hotel by 4:30pm
Lunch: On your own; the tour will stop in the Historic Davenport Downtown where attendees can choose from several restaurants.
Suggested Gear: Weather-appropriate clothing and comfortable walking shoes
There was a problem loading this area.

Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail & Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge

Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail commemorates a dramatic series of events. Toward the end of the last Ice Age, a lobe of the Cordilleran ice sheet formed a dam that blocked the Clark Fork River at present-day Sandpoint, Idaho, creating a massive lake 200 miles long and up to 2,000 feet deep. The ice dam broke catastrophically, and Glacial Lake Missoula, which contained more than 500 cubic miles of water, drained within a matter of days. An enormous flood of water, ice, and debris charged westward along established drainages and across dry land, covering 16,000 square miles. Eventually, the flood waters reached the Pacific Ocean and continued hundreds of miles beyond the shoreline. This process happened many times, each time carving and reshaping the land. Today, evidence of the immense floods remains in many forms including high water lines, huge current dunes, boulders transported hundreds of miles, giant coulees and dry falls, and enormous gravel bars. These reminders of the floods exist across the states of Montana, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon.

Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge encompasses approximately 18,217 acres of the Channeled Scablands created by the Ice Age Floods. The powerful forces of volcanism, glaciation, and some of the largest floods in geological history have combined to forge a distinct environment. The combination of basalt outcrops, flood-eroded channels, and ponderosa pine forests infused in a diverse landscape of over 130 marshes, wetlands, and lakes create an environment of aesthetic beauty as well as high-quality wildlife habitat.

Join Dr. Gary Ford, retired soil scientist and President of the Ice Age Floods Institute, on a tour of Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge to study the flood evidence left behind after the last Ice Age. This session will include a presentation at the visitor center and then a drive along the refuge’s auto route with stops along the way to look for evidence of the ice age floods.

Please note: This tour is contingent upon weather permitting.

Time: 8:00am–4:30pm
Cost: $85
Maximum Number of Participants: 25
Minimum Number of Participants: 15
Travel: Bus pick-up at the Davenport Grand. Board at 8:00am; return to hotel by 4:30pm.
Lunch: Boxed lunch provided.
Suggested Gear: Weather-appropriate clothing and comfortable walking shoes
There was a problem loading this area.

History of the Interior Salish Tribes of Spokane

Our guide Mr. Chet Caskey has given tours for the National Geographic Northwest Columbia River Expeditions and Road Scholar. Stops include the Drumheller Springs “High Ground” of the City, Chief Spokane Garry Monuments, the Spokane Falls, and Latah Creek overlook for histories of Medicine Woman Colestah and Chief Kamiakin with stories of the great Prophet Yurareechen (the Circling Raven).

Author Chet Caskey, Regional Tour Guide and Certified Tourism Ambassador, was the Historian for Spokane’s Community Cemeteries for three years. He is an advocate for the preservation of Spokane’s unique heritage and a popular speaker about the city and its many facets.

Time: 8:30–10:30am
Costs: $30
Maximum Number of Participants: 29
Minimum Number of Participants: 12
Travel: The bus departs the Davenport Grand at 8:15am with a departure time of 8:30am; return to the hotel around 10:45am
Lunch is not provided
There was a problem loading this area.

Old Missions State Park – Coeur d’Alene

Join us as we explore Idaho’s oldest standing building and the high-quality display of Sacred Encounters: Father DeSmet and the Indians of the Rocky Mountain West. A guided bus tour will take you from Spokane to Cataldo, Idaho, where you will stop at Coeur d’Alene’s Old Mission State Park and visit the historic Cataldo Mission, Parish House, visitor center, and museum. Learn about the Coeur d’Alene Tribe culture and historic sites along the way and at the park. Visit with Coeur d’Alene Tribe members and learn about the partnership between the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation and the Coeur d’Alene Tribe to manage the site. Have lunch on your own at the Enaville Resort known as the “Snake Pit” (no snakes are involved—just a unique architecture of an 1800s building).

Cataldo Mission stands serenely as a living landmark on a hilltop 24 miles east of Coeur d’Alene along I-90. The Mission is unique in its architecture and romantic in its history, beckoning to all who pass. Constructed in 1850–53 by members of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe and Catholic Missionaries, the church is the focal point of Coeur d’Alene’s Old Mission State Park. Cataldo Mission is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Mission’s architecture style and construction are amazing, as is the thought that workers had the simplest of tools to create the scenic wonder. Most of the work was completed with ropes and pulleys, a broad-axe, an auger, a pen knife, and an improvised whipsaw. Willow saplings were fastened to uprights, woven with grass, and plastered with mud and clay to form walls. The hard working tribe members and priests formed a part of Idaho history that is found in no other Idaho location. They built a Mission, Parish House, other buildings and a village that supported the Tribe, priests and other travelers, which were used in many diverse ways and by different cultures.

Sponsored by: Idaho State Park and Recreation
Time: 8:00am–3:30pm
Cost: $60
Maximum Number of Participants: 25
Minimum Number of Participants: 15
Travel: Depart the Davenport Grand at 8:00am; return to hotel by 3:30pm
Lunch is not provided, however time is provided at the Snake Pit Restaurant
Suggested Gear: Weather-appropriate clothing and comfortable walking shoes
There was a problem loading this area.

Relish! Food & Walking

A historic and cultural experience: While your taste buds are tantalized, you will be immersed in the quaint, historical atmosphere of Spokane. Guides will share with you their knowledge of antique buildings, raging rivers, amazing dams, hidden parks, and quiet corners of the city that will have you believing you are truly one of our very own spirited Spokanites.

As you stroll through the city, your appetite will be satisfied by several savory tastings from local bakeries, bistros, and other unique shops. The visits range from French delights to saucy bites that will provide enough of the local ethnic eateries to get you acquainted with the real Spokane! All the tastings are included in the tour experience and price.

Relish! Spokane food tour is for the “foodie” looking to spice up their tasting experience with local, unique Spokane foods while learning about the untold stories and history of Spokane. In the end, you’ll visit five or six delicious local stops!

Time: Sign up for 12:30, 1:00, or 1:30pm
Cost: $60
Maximum Number of Participants: 12 per block
Minimum Number of Participants: 6 per block (If the minimum for your block is not met, we will accommodate you in another group.)
Meet: Riverfront Park at the Radio Flyer
Distance Covered 1.5 to 2 miles
Suggested Gear: Weather-appropriate clothing and comfortable walking shoes

There was a problem loading this area.
There was a problem loading this area.
There was a problem loading this area.

Fort Spokane at Lake Roosevelt NRA

National Park Service staff will provide a brief presentation and lead a facilitated dialogue for interested parties. There will be time for exploring the visitor center and surrounding grounds.

Fort Spokane, the last army frontier post established in the Northwest, was strategically located at the convergence of the Columbia River and the Spokane River about 50 miles northwest of the city of Spokane. Established in 1880, the post served to consolidate older posts like Fort Colville and Camp Chelan and to serve as a buffer between local tribes and settlers in the area. The site served as an army post until 1898 when the Spanish–American War broke out and troops were sent to Cuba and Fort George Wright in Spokane. In 1899, the fort and buildings were turned over to the Bureau of Indian Affairs as the Colville Tribal Office where it was repurposed twice: first as a boarding school for Indian children and again as a tuberculosis sanitarium for the neighboring reservations. The site was vacated by the government in 1929 until it was assigned to the National Park Service in 1960.

Today, four buildings remain of the original 50. The 1892 guard house serves as the visitor center with a 10-minute video on the history of Fort Spokane in addition to exhibits on the military, boarding school, and sanitarium phases of the fort. The Sentinel Trail provides a self-guided tour of the parade grounds and takes you to the mule barn and powder magazine.

Time: 8:30am–12:30pm
Cost: $45
Maximum Number of Participants: 26
Minimum Number of Participants: 15
Travel: The bus meets at the Davenport Grand at 8:00am with a departure time of 8:30am; return to the hotel around 12:30pm
Lunch is not provided
Suggested Gear: Weather-appropriate clothing and comfortable walking shoes
There was a problem loading this area.



2017 NAI National Conference

Spokane, Washington

November 14-18, 2017

 

Registration

Register Online
Download Conference Information