Remote Concurrent Sessions

New this year!

Unique opportunity to attend concurrent sessions in the French Quarter! 
We are excited to offer remote concurrent sessions that take you out of the hotel conference room to local cultural and historical sites in the French Quarter! These sessions are a great way to learn from the presenters in their place of work. Due to limited space these sessions will require that attendees register for the sessions before the conference. Once the maximum has been reached the session will be closed. Please note that transportation to the sites will not be provided. You will meet your host in the lobby of the Marriott and walk to the location. All are within walking distance from the hotel. Register and sign up now, as these sessions will fill early!

Wednesday, November 28


1:30–3:00pm

Historic Homes and Tourism: The Special Issues We Face Today
Hermann-Grima House, 820 Saint Louis Street (.5 miles / 9-minute walk)

New Orleans’s economy is fully rooted in tourism. Furthermore, this vibrant metropolis is a rich historical city whose visual fabric is based on its unique geographical topography and, more importantly, in some cases, on its architectural envelope. As stewards of our architectural and cultural heritage we find ourselves in a precarious push and pull between preserving and teaching our architectural legacy while keeping pace with the times and welcoming new members to the community. This panel looks at the special issues that the stewards of our architectural history and preservation face while also welcoming visitors and new residents.

Presenters: Megan Koza Mitchell, Executive Director, Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses; Meg Lousteau, Executive Director, Vieux Carré Property Owners, Residents, and Associates; and TBC

Maximum Number of Participants: 30 (Pre-registration required)
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Creating Successful School Partnerships: Lycee Francais and Audubon Nature Institute
Audubon Aquarium, 1 Canal St. (.4 miles / 7-minute walk)

We will share the story of the long-term partnership between Audubon and a local public French immersion school. Challenges, opportunities, and successes from the partnership will be shared with participants who may want to develop a similar program at their facility.

Presenter: Tricia LeBlanc, Director of Education Programs, Audubon

Maximum Number of Participants: 30 (Pre-registration required)
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The Bird Grasshoppers and the Bees: An Education for Educators about Entertaining with Insects
Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium, 423 Canal St (one block from hotel)

Insects and their close kin have bad press agents. Learn how staff and volunteers at Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium communicate with guests about these fascinating yet maligned creatures. We will discuss the use of live animals in presentations, accuracy of information, presentation styles, broader philosophies, guest engagement, and more. An additional portion of the session will introduce the audience to entomophagy, which is the practice of eating insects. A quick cooking demonstration and of course tastings (yay!) will be included along with an overview of ways to go about adding this activity to a zoo or museum space. Question-and-answer time will be left at the end of the session.

Presenters: Zack Lemann, Curator of Animal Collections, Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium

Maximum Number of Participants: 30 (Pre-registration required)
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Thursday, November 29


10:45–12:15

Methodology of Historic Cooking Demonstrations as Interpretive Tools
Hermann-Grima House, 820 Saint Louis Street (.5 miles / 9-minute walk)

Kitchens and cooking have long been the places and events for conversation, discussion, family, and community. The Hermann-Grima Historic House’s restored 1830s open hearth kitchen provides a unique setting for biweekly cooking demonstrations in New Orleans’ French Quarter that allows for a more inclusive and open experience of our history, giving visitors an entrée into harder discussions concerning race, class, gender. At the Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic House, volunteer cooks shop for ingredients, use 19th-century methods of food preparation, and invite guests in for an authentic sensory experience. All of the dishes they prepare utilize period specific recipes for dishes such as pain perdu, gateau sirop, chicken on the spit, jambalaya, beets piquant, and more. Join us as we take you through one of our cooking demonstrations and share how we use cooking to interpret the past.

Presenters: Katie Burlison, Curator, Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses and the volunteer cooking team at Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses 

Maximum Number of Participants: 30 (Pre-registration required)
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Intentional Inclusion in Interpretation 
The Historic New Orleans Collections (THNOC), 520/533 Royal Street (.5 miles / 9-minute walk)

The challenges and solutions of expanding interpretation to include a more accurate representation of a community's history when faced with a longstanding misinformed narrative.

Unique opportunity! This session runs concurrent with sessions offered at the hotel. We'll post the full schedule soon and we do ask that, as a courtesy to the presenters and other participants, if you sign up please be sure to attend. Space is limited-once full the session will be closed.

Presenters: Mathew Brady McKellar
Maximum Number of Participants: 25 (Pre-registration required)
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REAL Stories: Legends and Lore in Suburbia 
Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve Visitor Center, French Quarter, 419 Decatur St. (.3 miles / 6-minute walk)

Legends in suburbia? Yes! A 350-year-old Long Island legend serves to illustrate the historic truth, the ancient lore and why both have a place in modern interpretation.

Unique opportunity! This session runs concurrent with sessions offered at the hotel. We'll post the full schedule soon and we do ask that, as a courtesy to the presenters and other participants, if you sign up please be sure to attend. Space is limited-once full the session will be closed.

Presenter: Janet Emily Demarest
Maximum Number of Participants: 30 (Pre-registration required)
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2:30–4:30pm 

Creating a New Normal: How We Changed the Model of Our Visitor Services Department
The Historic New Orleans Collections, 520/533 Royal Street, New Orleans (.5 miles / 9-minute walk)

The Visitor Services Department at The Historic New Orleans Collection was once known as the Docent Department. Paid staff and volunteers served all job duties including touring, greeting, ticketing, and providing security. Over the years, the staff had increased in size, but the department was not adapting to the new challenges of our changing institutional needs. With the opening of a new building and expansion, THNOC took the opportunity to update our department and change the model of staffing, without sacrificing our excellent service standards. Take an overview tour of the new building, then listen to the challenges they have faced with change, creating new programs, and learning from visitors and each other. There will be round table discussions following the presentation.

Presenters: Daniel Hammer, Deputy Director; Lori Boyer, Head of Visitor Services; Joanna Robinson, Interpretation Assistant 

Maximum Number of Participants: 20 (Pre-registration required)
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Faces of Culture 
Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve Visitor Center, 419 Decatur St. (.3 miles / 6-minute walk)

This session includes a demonstration program and facilitated dialogue on building trust. How do you share a contemporary culture or tradition that you’re not directly a part of but one that you care for, give space to, and make available to those outside the tradition? How do you approach the practicing community? How do you build trust? How do you sensitively honor the tradition? How do you connect it to civil discourse? New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park interpreters frequently navigate these circumstances. The first hour of this session will begin with a demonstration program with panelists from the Black Masking Indian Suiting community of New Orleans, a unique tradition rooted in resistance, remembrance, ritual, and resilience. Beginning with a participatory experience of call and response in “Indian Red,” panelists will then generously engage in an open conversation about their culture. The presenters include Chief Daryl Montana, artist and recently retired Chief of Yellow Pocahontas; Sabrina Mays, community organizer exemplifying the large contributions of women in masking Indian culture; and Kalamu Ya Salam, poet whose words give the listener an opportunity to delve into deep imaginative experience of this complex practice.

Presenters: Karen Armagost and Park Ranger Bud Holmes

Maximum Number of Participants: 30 (Pre-registration required)
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Friday, November 30


10:15-12:15pm

Preservation Hall: It’s More Than Just Music 
Preservation Hall, 726 St. Peter St. (.6 miles / 11-minute walk)

New Orleans’ Preservation Hall was established in 1961 to honor one of America’s truest art forms, traditional New Orleans jazz. From its early years as an art gallery space to housing the Congress of Racial Equality, Preservation Hall has served many roles to the New Orleans community. During this session, participants will tour the facility, learning more about the space as well as the work Preservation Hall does in the community, which includes music education, outreach, and an archive, as well as support for aging culture bearers in the community. After learning more about the space, the Preservation All-Stars will perform and provide participants to a deeper insight into New Orleans music and challenges facing the cultural community.

Presenter: Ashley Shabankareh, Director of Programs, and the Preservation Hall All-Stars 

Maximum Number of Participants: 30 (Pre-registration required)
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Cabinet of Curiosities 
Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve Visitor Center, French Quarter, 419 Decatur St. (.3 miles / 6-minute walk)

What happens when the museum comes to the people? Experiment with design thinking, creating spontaneous interventions, & encouraging touch and interaction with collection items.

Unique opportunity! This session runs concurrent with sessions offered at the hotel. We'll post the full schedule soon and we do ask that, as a courtesy to the presenters and other participants, if you sign up please be sure to attend. Space is limited-once full the session will be closed.

Presenter: Victoria Baird
Maximum Number of Participants: 30 (Pre-registration required)
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A Museum of a Place: The Historic New Orleans Collection’s Ever-Adapting Preservation Mission 
The Historic New Orleans Collections (THNOC), 520/533 Royal Street (.5 miles / 9-minute walk)

French Quarter preservation is central to the mission of The Historic New Orleans Collection (THNOC). As a core concern of founders Kemper and Leila Williams, this commitment predates the 1966 founding of the institution. As THNOC has grown, the French Quarter has changed, as have preservation needs and practices. We have worked with archaeologists, architects, preservationists, and other specialists to ensure that renovations as well as new construction faithfully reflect their historical surroundings—and that we take advantage of every opportunity presented by the historic fabric of our place to inform our interpretive program. Attendees of this workshop will hear from THNOC staff and preservation practitioners about specific ways that we accomplish preservation action and teaching, with a focus on our most recent building project, a 36,000-square-foot exhibition facility composed half of new construction and half of renovated and adapted historic structures. The program will include plenty of opportunity for discussion and a guided tour of THNOC sites that illustrate our preservation efforts.

Presenters: Daniel Hammer, deputy director of The Historic New Orleans Collection; Howard Margot, land-records archivist and database curator, The Historic New Orleans Collection; Courtney Williams and Michael Shoriak, Cypress Building Conservation 

Maximum Number of Participants: 20 (Pre-registration required)
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2018 NAI National Conference
New Orleans, Louisiana

November 27 – December 1

Lodging

New Orleans Marriott
555 Canal Street
Book a room in NAI's room block.

Single/Double $149 (plus taxes)
Triple – add $25
Quad – add $50

Interested in Sponsorships or Advertising?

Contact NAI Events Manager Michele Farmer at mfarmer@interpnet.com or 970-484-8283 x805.

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